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The Home Gain Exclusion: Make Sure You Qualify!
Across the country, many homeowners are cashing out to multiples over list price, especially since one of the largest tax breaks available to most individuals is the ability to exclude up to $250,000 ($500,000 married) in capital gains on the sale of your personal residence. Here is what you need to know.
Background
As long as you own and live in your home for two of the five years before selling your home, you qualify for this capital gain tax exclusion. Here are the official hurdles you must jump over to qualify for this tax break:
• Main home. This is a tax term with a specific definition. Your main home can be a traditional home, a condo, a houseboat, or mobile home. Main home also means the place of primary residence when you own two or more homes.
• Ownership test. You must own your home during two of the past five years.
• Residence test. You must live in the home for two of the past five years.
• Other nuances:
o You can pass the ownership test and the residence test at different times.
o You may only use the home gain exclusion once every two years.
o You and your spouse can be treated jointly OR separately depending on circumstances.

When to pay attention:
You live in your home for a long time. The longer you live in your home, the more likely you will have a large capital gain. Long-time homeowners should check to see if they have a capital gain prior to selling their home.
You have old home gain deferrals. Prior to the current rules, home gains could be rolled into the next home purchased. These old deferred gains reduce the cost of your current home and can result in a capital gains tax.
Two homes into one. Newly married couples with two homes have a potential tax liability as both individuals may pass the required tests on their own property but not on their new spouse’s property. Prior to selling these individual homes, you may wish to create a plan of action that reduces your tax exposure.
Selling a home after divorce. Property transferred as a result of a divorce is not deemed a sale of your home. However, if the ex-spouse that retains the home later sells the home, it may have an impact on the available amount of gain exemption.
You are helping an older family member. Special rules apply to the elderly who move out of a home and into assisted living and nursing homes. Prior to selling property, it is best to review options and their related tax implications.
You do not meet the five-year rule. In some cases you may be eligible for a partial gain exclusion if you are required to move for work, disability, or unforeseen circumstances.
Other situations. There are a number of other exceptions to the home gain exclusion rules. This includes foreclosure, debt forgiveness, inheritance, and partial ownership.

#GainExclusion #TaxBreak #HomeOwners
... See MoreSee Less

The Home Gain Exclusion: Make Sure You Qualify!
Across the country, many homeowners are cashing out to multiples over list price, especially since one of the largest tax breaks available to most individuals is the ability to exclude up to $250,000 ($500,000 married) in capital gains on the sale of your personal residence. Here is what you need to know.
Background
As long as you own and live in your home for two of the five years before selling your home, you qualify for this capital gain tax exclusion. Here are the official hurdles you must jump over to qualify for this tax break:
• Main home. This is a tax term with a specific definition. Your main home can be a traditional home, a condo, a houseboat, or mobile home. Main home also means the place of primary residence when you own two or more homes.
• Ownership test. You must own your home during two of the past five years.
• Residence test. You must live in the home for two of the past five years.
• Other nuances:
o You can pass the ownership test and the residence test at different times.
o You may only use the home gain exclusion once every two years.
o You and your spouse can be treated jointly OR separately depending on circumstances.

When to pay attention:
You live in your home for a long time. The longer you live in your home, the more likely you will have a large capital gain. Long-time homeowners should check to see if they have a capital gain prior to selling their home.
You have old home gain deferrals. Prior to the current rules, home gains could be rolled into the next home purchased. These old deferred gains reduce the cost of your current home and can result in a capital gains tax.
Two homes into one. Newly married couples with two homes have a potential tax liability as both individuals may pass the required tests on their own property but not on their new spouse’s property. Prior to selling these individual homes, you may wish to create a plan of action that reduces your tax exposure.
Selling a home after divorce. Property transferred as a result of a divorce is not deemed a sale of your home. However, if the ex-spouse that retains the home later sells the home, it may have an impact on the available amount of gain exemption.
You are helping an older family member. Special rules apply to the elderly who move out of a home and into assisted living and nursing homes. Prior to selling property, it is best to review options and their related tax implications.
You do not meet the five-year rule. In some cases you may be eligible for a partial gain exclusion if you are required to move for work, disability, or unforeseen circumstances.
Other situations. There are a number of other exceptions to the home gain exclusion rules. This includes foreclosure, debt forgiveness, inheritance, and partial ownership.

#GainExclusion #TaxBreak #HomeOwners

Summer Jobs and Taxes
Now is the time to prepare for the not-so-pleasant part of having a summer job – paying taxes! Here’s what you can expect depending on what type of job you have this summer.
• The employee. A job at a retail store or restaurant generates earned income that is subject to payroll and income taxes. Paying taxes as an employee is super easy, as all necessary taxes will be withheld from your paycheck. You may need to file a tax return if wages and tips are more than $12,950, which is the standard deduction for single taxpayers in 2022.
• The family business. A job at a family business will also generate earned income that is subject to payroll and income taxes. If you are under age 18, receive reasonable compensation for a legitimate job, and the business is either a sole proprietorship or an LLC, you could qualify for an exemption from Social Security, Medicare, and federal unemployment taxes.
• The entrepreneur. A job such as mowing lawns, working on computers or dog walking will generate earned income that is subject to income taxes. You will also have to pay a 15.3% self-employment tax on all profits. Paying taxes as an entrepreneur or business owner also involves making payments to the IRS, either electronically or via check, throughout the year.
• The domestic worker. Performing chores such as babysitting and cleaning for neighbors may trigger the household employee rules, also known as the nanny tax. This can be good news, as these jobs are typically exempt from Social Security and Medicare taxes when paid to workers under age 18 who are considered household employees.

Here are some suggestions for understanding how taxes will affect your summer job:
Explain how taxes are withheld. If you are an employee, take one of your paychecks and review how each dollar amount is calculated. This will also help you understand the different types of taxes, including federal and state income taxes, Social Security taxes and Medicare taxes.
Set up a savings account. If you have your own business, you’ll need to set aside a certain percentage of the money you earn to pay the IRS. An easy way to do this is by transferring a certain portion of the money into a savings account. Pay attention to the quarterly estimated due dates throughout the year – April 15th, June 15th, September 15th and January 15th. These are the deadlines for you to send tax payments to the IRS.
Lower your tax bill. Consider opening an IRA that can help you start saving for the future while potentially lowering your taxes. This helps establish a healthy savings habit while understanding it is possible to pay less in taxes!
Please call if you have questions about taxes and how they apply to your summer job.

#Summer #Jobs #Taxes
... See MoreSee Less

Summer Jobs and Taxes
Now is the time to prepare for the not-so-pleasant part of having a summer job – paying taxes! Here’s what you can expect depending on what type of job you have this summer.
• The employee. A job at a retail store or restaurant generates earned income that is subject to payroll and income taxes. Paying taxes as an employee is super easy, as all necessary taxes will be withheld from your paycheck. You may need to file a tax return if wages and tips are more than $12,950, which is the standard deduction for single taxpayers in 2022.
• The family business. A job at a family business will also generate earned income that is subject to payroll and income taxes. If you are under age 18, receive reasonable compensation for a legitimate job, and the business is either a sole proprietorship or an LLC, you could qualify for an exemption from Social Security, Medicare, and federal unemployment taxes.
• The entrepreneur. A job such as mowing lawns, working on computers or dog walking will generate earned income that is subject to income taxes. You will also have to pay a 15.3% self-employment tax on all profits. Paying taxes as an entrepreneur or business owner also involves making payments to the IRS, either electronically or via check, throughout the year.
• The domestic worker. Performing chores such as babysitting and cleaning for neighbors may trigger the household employee rules, also known as the nanny tax. This can be good news, as these jobs are typically exempt from Social Security and Medicare taxes when paid to workers under age 18 who are considered household employees.

Here are some suggestions for understanding how taxes will affect your summer job:
Explain how taxes are withheld. If you are an employee, take one of your paychecks and review how each dollar amount is calculated. This will also help you understand the different types of taxes, including federal and state income taxes, Social Security taxes and Medicare taxes.
Set up a savings account. If you have your own business, you’ll need to set aside a certain percentage of the money you earn to pay the IRS. An easy way to do this is by transferring a certain portion of the money into a savings account. Pay attention to the quarterly estimated due dates throughout the year – April 15th, June 15th, September 15th and January 15th. These are the deadlines for you to send tax payments to the IRS.
Lower your tax bill. Consider opening an IRA that can help you start saving for the future while potentially lowering your taxes. This helps establish a healthy savings habit while understanding it is possible to pay less in taxes!
Please call if you have questions about taxes and how they apply to your summer job.

#Summer #Jobs #Taxes

Watch Out! Vacation Costs That Sneak Up on You
Going on vacation is a time to get away, relax and enjoy new experiences. But if you don’t pay close attention, extra costs can sneak up on you like tiny money-stealing ninjas. Here are eight sneaky vacation costs.

1. Covert airfare increases. Airline pricing algorithms are programmed to store your browsing history to see if you’ve been looking at flights. If you have, they will bump up the price. Before searching, clear your internet history and switch to private (or incognito) mode on your web browser. When you are finally ready to book the flight, do so using a different computer from a new location to avoid this artificial price increase.
2. Stealthy fees. The nightly base rate for a fancy resort or self-rental often compares favorably to a standard hotel in the same location. This can be an intentional pricing tactic used to get their property on the initial search results page. Don’t be fooled! These same places often add a daily resort fee or high cleaning cost on to your bill. The extra fees might be worth it to you, but it’s better to understand the full cost of the stay before making your reservation.
3. Bait and switch. In the self-rental marketplace, a property management service may feature a great-looking rental, but when you try to book it, it is not available. They then try to switch you to a less desirable property. Even worse, a single property can be listed on numerous services so that property you think you reserved is actually already rented to someone else!
4. Useless rental car insurance. Rental car companies will try to sell you insurance to cover damages you may cause during the rental period. The auto insurance you already have many times will extend to the rental car. In these cases, the extra insurance isn’t necessary. Before renting a car, check with your insurance company to see if a rental will be covered.
5. Bloated baggage fees. You probably already know that airlines may charge for checking in a bag, but did you know they will charge extra if a bag is too heavy? Exact weight can vary by airline or location, so check the weight limits before you go and weigh any heavy bags using a bathroom scale.
6. Crafty parking costs. Downtown hotels in big cities charge as high as $75 per night for parking! Research alternative parking options near your hotel or compare the cost of using ride share options before committing to the hotel rate.
7. Extra driver charges. Rental car companies will charge an extra daily fee to have a second driver listed on the rental. If possible, commit to one person to handle all the driving on your vacation.
8. Tricky foreign transaction fees. Traveling abroad and paying an extra fee for every purchase will add up in a hurry. Before you go, check your credit cards, bank accounts and cell phones to see if they charge foreign transaction fees. If they do, shop for another card, account or cell phone that doesn’t charge fees.

Everyone expects to pay for their vacation, but with a little planning you can avoid dealing with unpleasant surprises during your vacation!

#Vacations #Expenses #Beware!
... See MoreSee Less

Watch Out! Vacation Costs That Sneak Up on You
Going on vacation is a time to get away, relax and enjoy new experiences. But if you don’t pay close attention, extra costs can sneak up on you like tiny money-stealing ninjas. Here are eight sneaky vacation costs.

1. Covert airfare increases. Airline pricing algorithms are programmed to store your browsing history to see if you’ve been looking at flights. If you have, they will bump up the price. Before searching, clear your internet history and switch to private (or incognito) mode on your web browser. When you are finally ready to book the flight, do so using a different computer from a new location to avoid this artificial price increase.
2. Stealthy fees. The nightly base rate for a fancy resort or self-rental often compares favorably to a standard hotel in the same location. This can be an intentional pricing tactic used to get their property on the initial search results page. Don’t be fooled! These same places often add a daily resort fee or high cleaning cost on to your bill. The extra fees might be worth it to you, but it’s better to understand the full cost of the stay before making your reservation.
3. Bait and switch. In the self-rental marketplace, a property management service may feature a great-looking rental, but when you try to book it, it is not available. They then try to switch you to a less desirable property. Even worse, a single property can be listed on numerous services so that property you think you reserved is actually already rented to someone else!
4. Useless rental car insurance. Rental car companies will try to sell you insurance to cover damages you may cause during the rental period. The auto insurance you already have many times will extend to the rental car. In these cases, the extra insurance isn’t necessary. Before renting a car, check with your insurance company to see if a rental will be covered.
5. Bloated baggage fees. You probably already know that airlines may charge for checking in a bag, but did you know they will charge extra if a bag is too heavy? Exact weight can vary by airline or location, so check the weight limits before you go and weigh any heavy bags using a bathroom scale.
6. Crafty parking costs. Downtown hotels in big cities charge as high as $75 per night for parking! Research alternative parking options near your hotel or compare the cost of using ride share options before committing to the hotel rate.
7. Extra driver charges. Rental car companies will charge an extra daily fee to have a second driver listed on the rental. If possible, commit to one person to handle all the driving on your vacation.
8. Tricky foreign transaction fees. Traveling abroad and paying an extra fee for every purchase will add up in a hurry. Before you go, check your credit cards, bank accounts and cell phones to see if they charge foreign transaction fees. If they do, shop for another card, account or cell phone that doesn’t charge fees.

Everyone expects to pay for their vacation, but with a little planning you can avoid dealing with unpleasant surprises during your vacation!

#Vacations #Expenses #Beware!

Tax Consequences of Virtual Transactions
As social distancing turns convenience into necessity, the number and types of activities moving to the internet is exploding. It’s important to remember that these virtual events often trigger real-world tax implications. Here are some things to keep in mind:

• Internet marketplaces – Proceeds of sales of goods and services on internet marketplaces can be taxable income. That's true whether you're a hobbyist or running an online business. Depending on your level of activity, tax rules may limit your deductions. Internet sales may also be subject to sales or use taxes, which vary by state. If the platform is considered a Marketplace Facilitator, sales taxes are collected by the marketplace itself and remitted to the appropriate taxing entities.
• The IRS is watching – New reporting requirements require more reselling activity to be reported to the IRS. So if you resell your sporting event tickets or concert tickets using an online tool, expect the platform to ask you for information about yourself, including your Social Security number. Why? E-bay, StubHub, Ticketmaster and similar platforms must now report a lot of this activity to the IRS via new Form 1099-K reporting rules!
• Online courses – Social media platforms are loaded with advertisements for how-to courses on every conceivable topic – including how to create your own online course. If you decide to share your knowledge in a particular subject matter by developing and selling an online course, proceeds can be subject to income tax. Sales and use taxes may also be due on the purchases of these courses in some jurisdictions.
• Crowdfunding – If you use crowdfunding platforms like Kickstarter or Indiegogo to raise funds for your business venture or project, the money you receive can be taxable. If you provide a reward in exchange for different amounts, the funds you receive are treated as sales proceeds. Crowdfunding transactions may also be subject to state sales and use taxes. If backers of your venture receive equity in your startup company, those transactions may not be taxable as income, but they are regulated by the Security and Exchange Commission.
• Online fundraising – Funds you receive through an online fundraising campaign to pay for medical bills, disaster recovery or other personal expenses generally are treated as nontaxable gifts. Donations to such campaigns may even qualify as deductible charitable contributions by the donors.
• Social media influencers – It may seem like fun to develop a significant following on social media, but capitalizing on that audience through product endorsements and other influencing activities is treated as business income. Endorsement payments are taxable and so is the value of any products received in exchange for reviews or brand placements in social media posts.
• Virtual currency – Payments you receive in the form of virtual currency for goods and services are treated similar to cash transactions and are included in your gross income at fair market value. But to add a level of complexity, that virtual currency is also considered property, which can result in taxable gains or losses. So you will also need to attach the fair market value to that virtual currency as of the receipt date of the currency. Then when you use the currency you will need to track a gain or loss on that future transaction.

#VirtualTransactions #Taxable #IRS
... See MoreSee Less

Tax Consequences of Virtual Transactions
As social distancing turns convenience into necessity, the number and types of activities moving to the internet is exploding. It’s important to remember that these virtual events often trigger real-world tax implications. Here are some things to keep in mind:

• Internet marketplaces – Proceeds of sales of goods and services on internet marketplaces can be taxable income. Thats true whether youre a hobbyist or running an online business. Depending on your level of activity, tax rules may limit your deductions. Internet sales may also be subject to sales or use taxes, which vary by state. If the platform is considered a Marketplace Facilitator, sales taxes are collected by the marketplace itself and remitted to the appropriate taxing entities.
• The IRS is watching – New reporting requirements require more reselling activity to be reported to the IRS. So if you resell your sporting event tickets or concert tickets using an online tool, expect the platform to ask you for information about yourself, including your Social Security number. Why? E-bay, StubHub, Ticketmaster and similar platforms must now report a lot of this activity to the IRS via new Form 1099-K reporting rules!
• Online courses – Social media platforms are loaded with advertisements for how-to courses on every conceivable topic – including how to create your own online course. If you decide to share your knowledge in a particular subject matter by developing and selling an online course, proceeds can be subject to income tax. Sales and use taxes may also be due on the purchases of these courses in some jurisdictions.
• Crowdfunding – If you use crowdfunding platforms like Kickstarter or Indiegogo to raise funds for your business venture or project, the money you receive can be taxable. If you provide a reward in exchange for different amounts, the funds you receive are treated as sales proceeds. Crowdfunding transactions may also be subject to state sales and use taxes. If backers of your venture receive equity in your startup company, those transactions may not be taxable as income, but they are regulated by the Security and Exchange Commission.
• Online fundraising – Funds you receive through an online fundraising campaign to pay for medical bills, disaster recovery or other personal expenses generally are treated as nontaxable gifts. Donations to such campaigns may even qualify as deductible charitable contributions by the donors.
• Social media influencers – It may seem like fun to develop a significant following on social media, but capitalizing on that audience through product endorsements and other influencing activities is treated as business income. Endorsement payments are taxable and so is the value of any products received in exchange for reviews or brand placements in social media posts.
• Virtual currency – Payments you receive in the form of virtual currency for goods and services are treated similar to cash transactions and are included in your gross income at fair market value. But to add a level of complexity, that virtual currency is also considered property, which can result in taxable gains or losses. So you will also need to attach the fair market value to that virtual currency as of the receipt date of the currency. Then when you use the currency you will need to track a gain or loss on that future transaction.

#VirtualTransactions #Taxable #IRS

Knocking Down Scholarship Barriers
There’s plenty of money available for you to pursue a post-secondary education for either you or your child! Here are several barriers that could be getting in the way of securing money to pay for school.
Common misconceptions
Scholarships are only for top scholars and athletes. Many of the splashy news stories are certainly about high-profile students who snag a fully-paid-for scholarship. There are an unbelievable number of scholarships, however, that do not take grades or athletic ability into consideration whatsoever.
Scholarships are only for students attending college. Enrollment in vocational and trade schools has nearly doubled since 2000, according to the National Center for Education Statistics. And the good news for prospective students is that scholarships for vocational and trade schools are just as plentiful as scholarships for four-year colleges and universities.
You have to be a great writer. Winning scholarships is more often about what you write than how you write. And for some scholarships, following the application’s directions and answering the questions that are asked is more important than how well you write.
You have to be a high school student. Scholarships aren’t just for soon-to-be high school graduates. Many schools have degree programs – and corresponding scholarships – aimed at older adults who are looking to learn new skills or make a transition in their career. Scholarships are also available for graduate students.
Finding scholarships takes too much time. Yes, you’ll need to invest a certain amount of time to find and apply for scholarships, but finding financial aid may not require as much of a time investment as you may think with tons of available online tools.
What to do
• Follow the directions! You’d be surprised how many applicants don’t read or follow the rules of the scholarships. Take the time to read through all instructions, and thoughtfully answer the questions that are asked.
• Apply every year by January. For every year that you’re attending a post-secondary school, consider setting aside some time in the fall and early winter to complete scholarship applications for the upcoming school year. Many applications need to be completed by January for the following school year.
• Ask your school. Nearly every college in the U.S. offers some form of merit-based financial aid. You’ll likely need to complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA), as many colleges have all students apply for scholarships by completing the FAFSA. This includes students who may qualify for only merit-based scholarships.
• Ask local businesses. Many local businesses, civic groups, foundations, and religious or community organizations offer scholarships. So ask around in your community about available financial aid.
The early bird often gets the worm, but the bird that does not go looking for one will never get one!
#Scholarships #College #Savings
... See MoreSee Less

Knocking Down Scholarship Barriers
There’s plenty of money available for you to pursue a post-secondary education for either you or your child! Here are several barriers that could be getting in the way of securing money to pay for school.
Common misconceptions
Scholarships are only for top scholars and athletes. Many of the splashy news stories are certainly about high-profile students who snag a fully-paid-for scholarship. There are an unbelievable number of scholarships, however, that do not take grades or athletic ability into consideration whatsoever.
Scholarships are only for students attending college. Enrollment in vocational and trade schools has nearly doubled since 2000, according to the National Center for Education Statistics. And the good news for prospective students is that scholarships for vocational and trade schools are just as plentiful as scholarships for four-year colleges and universities.
You have to be a great writer. Winning scholarships is more often about what you write than how you write. And for some scholarships, following the application’s directions and answering the questions that are asked is more important than how well you write.
You have to be a high school student. Scholarships aren’t just for soon-to-be high school graduates. Many schools have degree programs – and corresponding scholarships – aimed at older adults who are looking to learn new skills or make a transition in their career. Scholarships are also available for graduate students.
Finding scholarships takes too much time. Yes, you’ll need to invest a certain amount of time to find and apply for scholarships, but finding financial aid may not require as much of a time investment as you may think with tons of available online tools.
What to do
• Follow the directions! You’d be surprised how many applicants don’t read or follow the rules of the scholarships. Take the time to read through all instructions, and thoughtfully answer the questions that are asked.
• Apply every year by January. For every year that you’re attending a post-secondary school, consider setting aside some time in the fall and early winter to complete scholarship applications for the upcoming school year. Many applications need to be completed by January for the following school year.
• Ask your school. Nearly every college in the U.S. offers some form of merit-based financial aid. You’ll likely need to complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA), as many colleges have all students apply for scholarships by completing the FAFSA. This includes students who may qualify for only merit-based scholarships.
• Ask local businesses. Many local businesses, civic groups, foundations, and religious or community organizations offer scholarships. So ask around in your community about available financial aid.
The early bird often gets the worm, but the bird that does not go looking for one will never get one!
#Scholarships #College #Savings

The Benefits of Being a Sole Proprietor
Many start-up businesses move from hobby status to a business when they start to make a profit. The tax entity typically used is a sole proprietorship. Taxes on this business activity type flow through your personal tax return on a Schedule C. This business form has many benefits. Here are some to consider:

• You can hire your kids and decrease your tax bill. As a sole proprietor, you can hire your kids and avoid paying Social Security and Medicare taxes for their work. While there are exceptions, this can generally save your small business over 7.65% on their wages.
• Your kids can benefit, too. Any income your kids earn that’s less than $12,950 isn’t taxed at the federal level. So this is a great way to build a tax-free savings account for your children. Remember, though, that their work must reflect actual activity and reasonable pay. So consider hiring your kids to do copying, act as a receptionist, provide office clean up, advertising or other reasonable activities for your business.
• Fewer tax forms and filings. As a sole proprietor, your business activity is reported on a Schedule C within your personal Form 1040 tax return. Other business types like an S corporation, C corporation or a partnership must file separate tax returns, which makes tax compliance a lot more complicated.
• More control over revenue and expense. You often have more control over the taxable income of your small business as a sole proprietor. This can provide more flexibility in determining the timing of some of your revenue and business expenses, which can be used as a great tax planning tool.
• Hire your spouse. If handled correctly, a spouse hired as an employee can work to your advantage as a sole proprietor. As long as the spouse is truly an employee of the business, the sole proprietor can benefit as a member of their employee’s (spouse’s) family benefits. This can include potential medical expense reimbursements.
• Funding a retirement account. You can also reduce your business' taxable income by placing some of the profits into a retirement account like an IRA. As a sole proprietor, you can readily manage your marginal tax rate by controlling the amount you wish to set aside in this pre-tax retirement account.
• It's not all roses. While there are many benefits of running your business as a sole proprietor, don't forget the drawbacks. One of the most significant drawbacks is the lack of personal legal protection, which is a feature in other business forms like corporations and Limited Liability Companies. Most sole proprietors address this with proper business insurance, so do not overlook the need to find coverage for yourself.

#SoleProprietor #ScheduleC
#Business
... See MoreSee Less

The Benefits of Being a Sole Proprietor
Many start-up businesses move from hobby status to a business when they start to make a profit. The tax entity typically used is a sole proprietorship. Taxes on this business activity type flow through your personal tax return on a Schedule C. This business form has many benefits. Here are some to consider:

• You can hire your kids and decrease your tax bill. As a sole proprietor, you can hire your kids and avoid paying Social Security and Medicare taxes for their work. While there are exceptions, this can generally save your small business over 7.65% on their wages.
• Your kids can benefit, too. Any income your kids earn that’s less than $12,950 isn’t taxed at the federal level. So this is a great way to build a tax-free savings account for your children. Remember, though, that their work must reflect actual activity and reasonable pay. So consider hiring your kids to do copying, act as a receptionist, provide office clean up, advertising or other reasonable activities for your business.
• Fewer tax forms and filings. As a sole proprietor, your business activity is reported on a Schedule C within your personal Form 1040 tax return. Other business types like an S corporation, C corporation or a partnership must file separate tax returns, which makes tax compliance a lot more complicated.
• More control over revenue and expense. You often have more control over the taxable income of your small business as a sole proprietor. This can provide more flexibility in determining the timing of some of your revenue and business expenses, which can be used as a great tax planning tool.
• Hire your spouse. If handled correctly, a spouse hired as an employee can work to your advantage as a sole proprietor. As long as the spouse is truly an employee of the business, the sole proprietor can benefit as a member of their employee’s (spouse’s) family benefits. This can include potential medical expense reimbursements.
• Funding a retirement account. You can also reduce your business taxable income by placing some of the profits into a retirement account like an IRA. As a sole proprietor, you can readily manage your marginal tax rate by controlling the amount you wish to set aside in this pre-tax retirement account.
• Its not all roses. While there are many benefits of running your business as a sole proprietor, dont forget the drawbacks. One of the most significant drawbacks is the lack of personal legal protection, which is a feature in other business forms like corporations and Limited Liability Companies. Most sole proprietors address this with proper business insurance, so do not overlook the need to find coverage for yourself.

#SoleProprietor #ScheduleC
#Business

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